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Monthly Archives: October 2012

Caramelized Onion Dip

Garden training session picnic, 9/19/12

This dip is a tasty accompaniment to fresh vegetables or whole-grain bread. On it’s own, it’s not particularly healthy, but it’s delicious in moderation.

  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 1/2 cup low-fat sour cream
  • 1/4 cup mayonnaise
  • 1/4 cup fat-free plain yogurt
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepepr

In a large skillet over medium-low heat, melt the butter. Add the onion and cook, stirring occasionally, until onion is completely tender and darker in color, about 45 minutes. If the onion is beginning to burn, toss some water in the pan.

In a bowl, mix the sour cream, mayonnaise, yogurt, salt, and pepper. Add caramelized onion and mix to combine.

Makes about 1 cup.

Halloween Chili

Committee meeting working lunch, 10/18/12 – served with pumpkin cornbread

The pumpkin and spice in this beef-and-bean chili adds a subtle taste and a lot of fiber, vitamin A, and other nutrients.

  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil, divided between beef and onions
  • 2 lbs ground beef
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 1 clove garlic, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon chili powder
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 2 14-ounce or 1 28-ounce can diced tomatoes in juice
  • 2 cans beans, any variety, drained from liquid
  • 2 cups pumpkin or other winter squash puree (see  instructions, or use canned)
  • 1 teaspoons pumpkin pie spice OR 3/4 teaspoon cinnamon and 1/4 teaspoon nutmeg, optional

In a large pot, heat 1 tablespoon oil and brown the beef. Remove the beef to a bowl or plate, then add the remaining tablespoon oil. Add onions and garlic and cook until onions are translucent and soft, about 5-7 minutes. Add chili powder and cumin and cook 1 minute more, stirring.

Add remaining ingredients (tomatoes, beans, pumpkin, and spices if using) and bring to a boil. Turn the heat down to low and simmer for 30-75 minutes – the longer the chili cooks, the tastier it will be.

Kale, Sweet Potato, and Bacon Frittata

Community meeting demonstration dinner, 10/3/12

Wondering what to do with unfamiliar greens? Try them with familiar flavors in a big omelet called a frittata. Similar recipes: Broccoli, Bacon, Pasta, and Parmesan Frittata and Tortilla Española with Kale

  • 1 large bunch (8-12 ounces) kale or other greens
  • 4 slices bacon, roughly chopped
  • 3 cups cooked cubed sweet potatoes (steamed, roasted, leftover – it all works) OR use leftover cooked pasta
  • 10 eggs
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • black pepper, to taste

Bring a pot of salted water to a boil. Add the kale and cook until almost tender (keep trying pieces to see how done it is). When kale is almost tender, remove to a colander to drain. Roughly chop.

Heat a large skillet. Add bacon and cook on medium heat until bacon is crisp. Remove bacon to a large bowl and leave grease in the pan. Turn off the heat while you prepare the rest of the ingredients.

To the bowl with the bacon, add chopped kale and cooked sweet potatoes. Add eggs, cracking each into a small bowl or cup before adding it to the large bowl (this is to make sure that a bad egg or pieces of shell won’t ruin your whole mixture). Add salt and pepper.

Turn the heat back on under the skillet with the bacon grease. When the grease is very hot, add the egg mixture and allow to cook over medium heat until cooked about halfway through, about 7-10 minutes.

Flipping the frittata: using potholders or oven mitts, place a large plate over the skillet. Take the whole business over the sink (just in case) and flip the half-cooked frittata out of skillet and onto the plate. Put the skillet back on the stove, then slide the frittata back into the pan, raw side down. Continue to cook until cooked through, 5-7 minutes, then flip or slide onto plate. Serve warm, room temperature, or cold. Serves 8.

Kale and Cabbage Coleslaw

Community Meeting Demonstration Dinner, 10/3/12

Raw kale is included in this coleslaw recipe – it’s an easy way to pack a lot of nutrition into a familiar dish.

  • 1/2 red onion (save the rest for something else)
  • 1/3 cup white wine or apple cider vinegar
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 6  large leaves kale
  • 1/4 large head cabbage (save the rest)
  • 2 red, orange, or yellow bell peppers
  • 4 carrots
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 2 tablespoons mayonnaise
  • 1 tablespoon Dijon or regular mustard
  • black pepper

Slice the red onion very thinly. Place in a small bowl, then add vinegar and salt. Set aside.

Wash and dry the kale. Strip the leaves off the stems and either discard the stems or save them to cook separately. Stack the several leaves on top of each other. Roll into a cigar shape, then slice across the roll in 1/3” strips to make thin ribbons. Repeat this with all leaves, and place the ribbons into a large bowl. Slice the cabbage into thin strips and add to bowl. Using a matchstick slicer or a larger grater, slice or grate the carrots into bowl. Slice peppers thinly and add to bowl. Remove onions from the vinegar and add to bowl.

To the remaining vinegar that had onions in it, add sugar, mayonnaise, and mustard. Mix well, then add salt and pepper to taste. Pour dressing over vegetables and toss to combine. Taste, and add salt and pepper as needed. Serves 8-12.

 

Roast Pork Sandwiches with Roasted Peppers and Spinach

Community meeting demonstration dinner, 10/3/12

These sandwiches are a great way to use leftover roast pork. Or, you could use other leftover roast meat or deli meats.

  • 4 rolls or buns, or other bread to make 6 sandwiches
  • 1 pound roast pork or other leftover or deli meat
  • 1 cup roasted red peppers, freshly roasted, jarred, or home-canned
  • 1 cup spinach or other greens 

Divide the pork between the 4 rolls. Top with roasted peppers and spinach. Serve.

Yield: 4 sandwiches.