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Tag Archives: fall

Not-Your-Average Coleslaw

Community meeting training session, 11/14/12

Cabbage and carrots get dressed up with quick-pickled onions and a creamy dressing. A variation of Cabbage, Apple, Red Onion, and Carrot Slaw.

  • 1/4 red onion, thinly sliced
  • 3 tablespoons cider vinegar
  • salt
  • 1/2 head cabbage, thinly sliced
  • 2 carrots, shredded into matchsticks or grated on a large grater
  • 2 teaspoons mustard (Dijon is best, but any kind will work)
  • 1 teaspoon honey (or sugar)
  • 1/3 cup mayonnaise
  • Black pepper (freshly ground if available)

In a small bowl, pour the cider vinegar over the sliced onion to cover it. Add a pinch of salt. Allow to sit for at least 20 minutes, or up to overnight in the fridge.

To a large bowl, add the shredded cabbage and carrots. Remove the onions from the vinegar and add them here, reserving the vinegar.

To the vinegar in the small bowl, whisk in mustard, honey, and mayonnaise. Add black pepper and additional salt to taste.

Pour desired amount of dressing (you won’t need all of it – use the rest on another slaw or salad within 2 weeks) over the vegetables and toss to combine.

**All ingredients in bold can be grown in your own garden or purchased at a farmers market.**

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Kale, Sweet Potato, and Bacon Frittata

Community meeting demonstration dinner, 10/3/12

Wondering what to do with unfamiliar greens? Try them with familiar flavors in a big omelet called a frittata. Similar recipes: Broccoli, Bacon, Pasta, and Parmesan Frittata and Tortilla Española with Kale

  • 1 large bunch (8-12 ounces) kale or other greens
  • 4 slices bacon, roughly chopped
  • 3 cups cooked cubed sweet potatoes (steamed, roasted, leftover – it all works) OR use leftover cooked pasta
  • 10 eggs
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • black pepper, to taste

Bring a pot of salted water to a boil. Add the kale and cook until almost tender (keep trying pieces to see how done it is). When kale is almost tender, remove to a colander to drain. Roughly chop.

Heat a large skillet. Add bacon and cook on medium heat until bacon is crisp. Remove bacon to a large bowl and leave grease in the pan. Turn off the heat while you prepare the rest of the ingredients.

To the bowl with the bacon, add chopped kale and cooked sweet potatoes. Add eggs, cracking each into a small bowl or cup before adding it to the large bowl (this is to make sure that a bad egg or pieces of shell won’t ruin your whole mixture). Add salt and pepper.

Turn the heat back on under the skillet with the bacon grease. When the grease is very hot, add the egg mixture and allow to cook over medium heat until cooked about halfway through, about 7-10 minutes.

Flipping the frittata: using potholders or oven mitts, place a large plate over the skillet. Take the whole business over the sink (just in case) and flip the half-cooked frittata out of skillet and onto the plate. Put the skillet back on the stove, then slide the frittata back into the pan, raw side down. Continue to cook until cooked through, 5-7 minutes, then flip or slide onto plate. Serve warm, room temperature, or cold. Serves 8.

Kale and Cabbage Coleslaw

Community Meeting Demonstration Dinner, 10/3/12

Raw kale is included in this coleslaw recipe – it’s an easy way to pack a lot of nutrition into a familiar dish.

  • 1/2 red onion (save the rest for something else)
  • 1/3 cup white wine or apple cider vinegar
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 6  large leaves kale
  • 1/4 large head cabbage (save the rest)
  • 2 red, orange, or yellow bell peppers
  • 4 carrots
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 2 tablespoons mayonnaise
  • 1 tablespoon Dijon or regular mustard
  • black pepper

Slice the red onion very thinly. Place in a small bowl, then add vinegar and salt. Set aside.

Wash and dry the kale. Strip the leaves off the stems and either discard the stems or save them to cook separately. Stack the several leaves on top of each other. Roll into a cigar shape, then slice across the roll in 1/3” strips to make thin ribbons. Repeat this with all leaves, and place the ribbons into a large bowl. Slice the cabbage into thin strips and add to bowl. Using a matchstick slicer or a larger grater, slice or grate the carrots into bowl. Slice peppers thinly and add to bowl. Remove onions from the vinegar and add to bowl.

To the remaining vinegar that had onions in it, add sugar, mayonnaise, and mustard. Mix well, then add salt and pepper to taste. Pour dressing over vegetables and toss to combine. Taste, and add salt and pepper as needed. Serves 8-12.

 

Pumpkin Oatmeal Cookies

Committee Meeting working lunch, 9/27/12 (used roasted cushaw squash puree)

These soft, chewy cookies have all the flavors of fall. You can use canned pumpkin, or you can use roasted squash puree from any kind of winter squash.

  • 1 cup all purpose flour
  • 1 cup whole wheat flour (or substitute more all purpose if unavailable)
  • 1 1/2 cups rolled oats or quick cooking oats (not instant)
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice OR 1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg, 1/4 teaspoon ground ginger, and 1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 cup (2 sticks) butter, softened
  • 1 cup brown sugar
  • 1 cup white sugar
  • 1 cup pumpkin puree (OR puree from any other winter squash)
  • 1 egg
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 1/2 cups chocolate chips OR raisins OR dried cherries/cranberries

Heat oven to 350. Grease baking sheets.

In a medium bowl, mix together both flours, oats, baking soda, spices, and salt.

In a large bowl using an electric mixer if available, cream butter and both sugars. Add pumpkin puree, egg, and vanilla and beat to combine. Add flour mixture and mix until combined. Add chocolate chips or dried fruit and mix in.

Drop dough by rounded tablespoons onto cookie sheets. Bake for 12-14 minutes, until lightly browned and set. Cool at least 2 minutes before removing from sheet.

Yield: about 48 cookies.

Toasted Squash Seeds

Seeds are the “free gift with purchase” when you have a squash. Turn them into a tasty snack with this recipe.

  • Seeds from one winter squash (pumpkinbutternutacorndelicata, etc), separated from pulp
  • 1 teaspoon vegetable, canola, or olive oil
  • 1 large pinch salt
  • Spices of your choice:
    • 1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
    • 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
    • 1 pinch cayenne pepper
    • 1/2 teaspoon chili powder

Preheat oven to 350. Mix all ingredients in a small bowl. Spread the seeds on a baking sheet and cook for about 30 minutes. Every 10 minutes or so, stir the seeds around a bit so they cook evenly. Seeds are done when they are crisp and golden brown.

Note: some seeds (especially from acorn squash) may begin to pop. Once they’re popping in the oven, they’re done.

Roasted Squash Puree 

Roasted squash puree can be substituted for canned pumpkin in any recipe. You can make a large batch and freeze it to use whenever you need.

  • 1 winter squash, any variety (butternut, acorn, delicata, buttercup, hubbard, red kuri, cushaw, etc)

Preheat oven to 400. Slice the squash in half in whatever way is easiest. Using a large spoon, scoop out the seeds and pulp. Save the seeds for toasting.

Place squash halves cut side down on a baking sheet. Roast until completely tender, about 90 minutes (timing will depend on the size of your squash). Allow to cool.

When cool, scoop the squash flesh away from the skin and place it in a bowl. Using a fork, mash the squash until it is fairly smooth. If desired, you could use a food processor, but a fork usually does the job well.

Use as you would canned pumpkin. Freeze for later use if desired.

Winter Squash (Pumpkin Spice) Angel Food Cake

Committee meeting working lunch, 9/6/12

Garden training picnic, 9/19/12

This light, airy cake becomes perfect for fall with the addition of pumpkin or squash and fall spices.

  • 1 cup powdered sugar
  • 1 cup flour
  • 3/4 cup cooked squash puree (you can use canned pumpkin, or any winter squash roasted and mashed)
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
  • 1 1/2 cups egg whites (about 12 whites)
  • 2 teaspoons cider vinegar
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup white sugar

Preheat oven to 350.

In a small bowl, combine flour and powdered sugar. Whisk or sift together to combine well. In a separate small bowl, combine squash or pumpkin, cinnamon, and nutmeg. Set both bowls aside.

In a very large bowl, use an electric mixer to begin beating the egg whites. When they get foamy, add the cider vinegar, vanilla, and salt. Continue to beat until whites are no longer clear, then gradually add the white sugar. Beat until shiny stiff peaks form.

Dust the flour mixture over the egg whites and gently fold in, using a spatula to cut down to the bottom center of the bowl, then slide up the side and fold the mixture over. Repeat this folding motion, turning the bowl to get all sides, until no flour streaks are visible.

Add the squash mixture to the batter and repeat the same gentle folding in motion, until fully incorporated.

Gently spoon into an ungreased tube pan or angel food cake pan. Bake for 35-45 minutes, until cake springs back when gently poked. Invert the cake pan on a rack or a stand that keeps the cake off the table. Allow to cool completely while upside down before removing from pan and serving.

Serves 10-12.