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Not-Your-Average Coleslaw

Community meeting training session, 11/14/12

Cabbage and carrots get dressed up with quick-pickled onions and a creamy dressing. A variation of Cabbage, Apple, Red Onion, and Carrot Slaw.

  • 1/4 red onion, thinly sliced
  • 3 tablespoons cider vinegar
  • salt
  • 1/2 head cabbage, thinly sliced
  • 2 carrots, shredded into matchsticks or grated on a large grater
  • 2 teaspoons mustard (Dijon is best, but any kind will work)
  • 1 teaspoon honey (or sugar)
  • 1/3 cup mayonnaise
  • Black pepper (freshly ground if available)

In a small bowl, pour the cider vinegar over the sliced onion to cover it. Add a pinch of salt. Allow to sit for at least 20 minutes, or up to overnight in the fridge.

To a large bowl, add the shredded cabbage and carrots. Remove the onions from the vinegar and add them here, reserving the vinegar.

To the vinegar in the small bowl, whisk in mustard, honey, and mayonnaise. Add black pepper and additional salt to taste.

Pour desired amount of dressing (you won’t need all of it – use the rest on another slaw or salad within 2 weeks) over the vegetables and toss to combine.

**All ingredients in bold can be grown in your own garden or purchased at a farmers market.**

Kale and Cabbage Coleslaw

Community Meeting Demonstration Dinner, 10/3/12

Raw kale is included in this coleslaw recipe – it’s an easy way to pack a lot of nutrition into a familiar dish.

  • 1/2 red onion (save the rest for something else)
  • 1/3 cup white wine or apple cider vinegar
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 6  large leaves kale
  • 1/4 large head cabbage (save the rest)
  • 2 red, orange, or yellow bell peppers
  • 4 carrots
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 2 tablespoons mayonnaise
  • 1 tablespoon Dijon or regular mustard
  • black pepper

Slice the red onion very thinly. Place in a small bowl, then add vinegar and salt. Set aside.

Wash and dry the kale. Strip the leaves off the stems and either discard the stems or save them to cook separately. Stack the several leaves on top of each other. Roll into a cigar shape, then slice across the roll in 1/3” strips to make thin ribbons. Repeat this with all leaves, and place the ribbons into a large bowl. Slice the cabbage into thin strips and add to bowl. Using a matchstick slicer or a larger grater, slice or grate the carrots into bowl. Slice peppers thinly and add to bowl. Remove onions from the vinegar and add to bowl.

To the remaining vinegar that had onions in it, add sugar, mayonnaise, and mustard. Mix well, then add salt and pepper to taste. Pour dressing over vegetables and toss to combine. Taste, and add salt and pepper as needed. Serves 8-12.

 

Kohlrabi Slaw

Community training dinner, 6/19/12

Kohlrabi is a very strange vegetable. It looks like an alien, its name means “cabbage-turnip,” and it tastes like broccoli stems. The bulb can be eaten raw or cooked (try roasting it with a little oil and salt in a 400 degree oven). In this recipe, it’s made into a simple, refreshing slaw. It’s important to peel kohlrabi before you use it – the skin and the layer underneath have a lot of stringy fibers. You can also eat the greens – see here for a recipe.

  • 2 kohlrabi bulbs
  • 1/4 cup herbs (basil, mint, parsley, dill, or another favorite – you can also use a combination)
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 2 tablespoons canola, vegetable, or olive oil
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon black pepper

Peel the kohlrabi using a paring knife. Then, use a grater or matchstick slicer to shred kohlrabi for slaw. Roughly chop the herbs and add it to the kohlrabi in a large bowl.

In a small bowl, whisk together the lemon juice, oil, salt, and pepper to make a vinaigrette. Pour over the kohlrabi and mint and toss to coat.

Serves 4-6 as a side dish.

Carrot and Radish Slaw with Mint and Lime

Committee meeting working lunch, 5/17/12

This salad uses fresh spring radishes, and it has a refreshing, bright flavor. This makes a good side dish to pair with heavier main courses to work in some fresh vegetables.

  • 1 pound carrots, shredded with a grater or matchstick slicer*
  • 10 radishes, shredded with a grater or matchstick slicer**
  • 1 small bunch mint, chopped to yield about 1/3 cup*
  • Juice of 2 limes (about 3 tablespoons)
  • 3 tablespoons canola or vegetable oil
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • black pepper to taste

Combine carrots, radishes, and mint in a bowl. In a separate small bowl, mix together lime juice, oil, salt and pepper. Pour over vegetables and toss to combine.

Serves 6 as a side dish.

*Carrots, radishes, and mint can all be grown here.

**Radishes are one of the first crops you can harvest from your garden in spring.

Cabbage, Apple, Red Onion, and Carrot Slaw

Committee meeting working lunch, 12/13/11

Community training session demonstration and dinner, 3/12/12

This slaw very different from the mayonnaise-heavy kind of coleslaw – it’s bright-tasting and light. It’s easiest to make if you have a slicer that can cut matchsticks. If you don’t, grate the carrots and apples on a large grater.

  • ½ red onion (save the rest for something else)*
  • ½ cup apple cider vinegar
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • ½ large head cabbage (save the rest for something else)*
  • 2 small, firm apples*
  • 4 carrots*
  • 2-3 tablespoons sugar (depending on how sweet you want your slaw)
  • 1 ½ tablespoons mustard (preferably Dijon, but any kind will work)
  • black pepper

Slice the red onion very thinly. Place in a small bowl, then add vinegar and a pinch of salt. Set aside while you prepare the rest of the slaw.

Slice the cabbage into thin strips. Using a matchstick slicer or a larger grater, slice or grate the apples and carrots.

In a large bowl, toss together the cabbage, apples, and carrots. Remove the onions from the vinegar and add them to the bowl.

To the remaining vinegar that had onions in it, add sugar, vinegar, and mustard. Whisk together, then add salt and pepper to taste.

Pour dressing over vegetables and toss to combine. Taste, and add salt and pepper as needed.

*All of these ingredients can be grown here in Nebraska and stored for extended periods.